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Author: Subject: How Great is Derek?

Zen Peach





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  posted on 10/6/2005 at 08:30 PM
I continue to be astonished by the incredible improvisational skill Derek is bringing to the table these days. He seems to be taking over in the way that Duane's playing took over the original band. Just how good is Derek? How many better guitarists can be playing right now? I love Warren Haynes as a guitarist and I am a huge fan of him as an overall musician. But in terms of pure skill, I think Derek is now better. At least Warren seems to be deferring to him. In my opinion, as a pure player, Derek is the closest thing to Duane since Duane.

Doug

 

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  posted on 10/7/2005 at 08:11 AM
Doug, I've often asked this question myself. He is one of the greatest guitar players in the world today. I'd say he is probably the youngest of the greatest, which bodes well for the future, hopefully. He is also the greatest slide or slide/straight combo player in the world IMO. I'd also venture to say of all the guitar greats, his style and sound is one of the most unique. A year or so ago I was of the opinion Derek was just flat out the greatest and then I saw an obviously sick and heavily congested Alan Holdsworth step on stage at BB Kings in NYC and he corrected my poor thinking very fast, lol. Seeing Pat Martino and Bucky Pizzarelli at the Les Paul birthday show further corrected my thinking. Truth is, there are a number of great 'master' players out there, so I'm content these days to say Derek is one of them and my favorite of them.

 

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  posted on 10/7/2005 at 08:30 AM
Derek is great. There is a certain degree of Derek worship around here that sometimes bugs me. As ozzypie says, Derek is only one of the great guitarists out there right now. There are others and there will be more. Also, I'm not sure I'd say that Derek is over Warren in skill. Warren is really good. Sometimes his tone gets at me, whereas Derek's tone is pretty much always welcome, but Warren is great too.

 

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  posted on 10/7/2005 at 08:32 AM
Well said Ozzypie.

Beyond the question of speed and dexterity, personally I'm drawn to players who seem to draw on their soul for inspiriation. Duane was like that and Derek is like that. Technique and dexterity can be learrned, but IMO that ethereal "Soulful" quality is a gift. And so far, I haven't found many musicians who have it.

 

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  posted on 10/7/2005 at 10:04 AM
He's THE greatest!!!!!

 

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  posted on 10/7/2005 at 12:11 PM
I agree witrh Ozzies points as well and I don't think we overdo it at all as far as Derek worship goes - He is a spectacular player with a gift that few have...we are ALL beginning to know just how good he is. I'm not gonna say THE best because there are lots of great Jazz players out there but he certainly one of the best. I do think he is THE best slide player however, just ahead of Sonny Landreth. Nobody does what Derek does on slide guitar, I am convinced of that. His horn-like phrasing is is so different and impressive compared to those that simply play delta-style blues...

I really believe in my heart he is as special and unique as they come. I look at it from two perspectives - the first, as simply a huge fan of his music and second as a listener from a guitar players standpoint - I've been playing 22 years myself. Although I am nowhere even remotely close to Derek's ability - hey, who is? - I know an amazing talent when I hear one. He is instantly recognizable right from the first note. His tone is to die for and the combination of playing in an open tuning and using fingers as opposed to a pick gives him a very unique musical voice. Another this is he plugs straight into his amp - no effects, no compressors, no overdrive pedals, no delay, no nothin'...its just Derek, his hands, heart, soul and his guitar - sort of like the old school players. He gets these incredible overtones that come simply from his attack and technique. Derek to me is basically bridging a gap between the old school blues and jazz players but giving them a fresh modern twist and energy without straying too far from what makes those styles what they are. Derek takes the blues for instance and advances it a few levels but still maintains the core of emotion that makes the blues what it is.

Derek is also an improvisational master who rarely repeats himself - throw anything at him and he has an answer. I think right now I am drawn to his playing more than any other along with probably Steve Kimock who is another master of improv. Derek continually reinvents himself so he never sounds stale or repetitive - he will always surprise you...he makes you listen harder and deeper into the layers and nuances of improvisational music. That my friends is what makes him what he is...





[Edited on 10/8/2005 by EddieP]

 
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  posted on 10/7/2005 at 09:07 PM
quote:
Derek is great. There is a certain degree of Derek worship around here that sometimes bugs me. As ozzypie says, Derek is only one of the great guitarists out there right now. There are others and there will be more. Also, I'm not sure I'd say that Derek is over Warren in skill. Warren is really good. Sometimes his tone gets at me, whereas Derek's tone is pretty much always welcome, but Warren is great too.


I'm not a guitar afficianado which is why I asked the question as to just how great he is. To my amature ears, I can't see how it could be much better. I stated in my post that I llove Warren as a guitarist and as a musician and I have never been a Derek worshipper until this year when I see him stepping up big time. I speak only of his work with the ABB as I am not that familuiar with his work with the DTB. At least not yet. "Joyful Noise" is on its way to my house.

Doug

 

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  posted on 10/8/2005 at 09:41 AM
Doug, seeing Derek with the ABB is great and listening to Derek's studio work is good too, but seeing the DTB live is a whole new world. If you get a chance maybe you could check out one of these upcoming shows.

Sat Nov. 12th Town Hall NYC 8pm
Tue Nov. 22nd State Theatre New Brunswick NJ 8pm (Special Olympics Benefit)
Sat Nov. 25th Imac Theatre Huntington Long Island TWO SHOWS!!! 8pm&10:30pm

Alot of us will be at some or all of these shows. Godwilling I'll be at all four ,I hope you can make one of them.

 

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  posted on 10/8/2005 at 10:48 AM
I always like to chart a player not only by their greatness,but also as a teacher.What I mean by this is when I see them is there something I can learn as a guitarist.With Derek I learn a whole new world or worlds of playing each and everytime I experience his live shows. It's that pusuit of digging deep into ones soul and pulling something out that you may not have known was in there before. It's hard to describe but if you've ever had it happen you know it when it happens.
Few players out there have the abillity to pull things out that deep and I think that is what puts Derek above the entire pack. Time will tell where Derek is ultimatley headed as a musician and if the past few years are any indication...........look out one and all. My son has said it best when he told me,"Derek is just rewriting how the guitar is played. And he will be a guitar player that future generations look to as how to play."
I really do beleive in the end his name will be spoken in the same sentence as Hendrix,SRV,Clapton and the list of players who've re-invented how we view playing the guitar.

 

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  posted on 10/8/2005 at 01:54 PM
quote:
Doug, seeing Derek with the ABB is great and listening to Derek's studio work is good too, but seeing the DTB live is a whole new world. If you get a chance maybe you could check out one of these upcoming shows.

Sat Nov. 12th Town Hall NYC 8pm
Tue Nov. 22nd State Theatre New Brunswick NJ 8pm (Special Olympics Benefit)
Sat Nov. 25th Imac Theatre Huntington Long Island TWO SHOWS!!! 8pm&10:30pm

Alot of us will be at some or all of these shows. Godwilling I'll be at all four ,I hope you can make one of them.


I might look into it since it doesn't look like I'm going to get my Mule fix this fall.

Doug

 

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  posted on 10/8/2005 at 02:51 PM
If it's not sold out, also consider the dTb show at the Keswick Theater on Nov 11th...
 
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  posted on 10/8/2005 at 08:34 PM
quote:
I always like to chart a player not only by their greatness,but also as a teacher.What I mean by this is when I see them is there something I can learn as a guitarist.With Derek I learn a whole new world or worlds of playing each and everytime I experience his live shows. It's that pusuit of digging deep into ones soul and pulling something out that you may not have known was in there before. It's hard to describe but if you've ever had it happen you know it when it happens.
Few players out there have the abillity to pull things out that deep and I think that is what puts Derek above the entire pack. Time will tell where Derek is ultimatley headed as a musician and if the past few years are any indication...........look out one and all. My son has said it best when he told me,"Derek is just rewriting how the guitar is played. And he will be a guitar player that future generations look to as how to play."
I really do beleive in the end his name will be spoken in the same sentence as Hendrix,SRV,Clapton and the list of players who've re-invented how we view playing the guitar.


The question is, given the music world we live in now, will Derek ever gain the kind of international fame that a Clapton or Hendrix received in the period when Rock music was the world and these men were regarded by the entire industry as great artists. Today the musicians we revere seem more separated from the larger pop world than they did in 1967. I don't see the DTB (or the ABB for that matter) getting on the pop charts. Can they gain the larger fame they so richly deserve if so much of the world is unaware of them?

Doug

 

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  posted on 10/8/2005 at 09:41 PM
Definately #1 in my book!

 

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  posted on 10/9/2005 at 03:07 AM
quote:
I don't see the DTB (or the ABB for that matter) getting on the pop charts. Can they gain the larger fame they so richly deserve if so much of the world is unaware of them? Doug


Doug I keep coming back to what Derek himself has said about this. Here's a quote from 2003:
quote:
I feel that when you look across the board, whether it's commercial radio or all the other things that are destroying the art of live music, I think it's at a very dangerous place right now...I understand that the pop scene is always going to be up front, but it shouldn't be 99 to 1. It shouldn't be 70 to 30. There's got to be some room for real music...

When you're force-feeding the masses the same crap, you're just dumbing people. You're dumbing people to music; you're lowering the standards. And not by a little, but by leaps and bounds. I attribute it to music being used now as a means to make bread only...

It's all about that you have to make a certain amount of money and sell a certain amount of records. There are no development deals anymore. The reason the Allman Brothers formed is that someone at Atlantic believed in Duane and said, ‘Go start a band.’ You know, ‘Here's some cash, you got a few years, try to make something happen.’ That kind of stuff rarely happens anymore.

I really don't want to know about your new pool. I want to know musically what you're trying to say, what you're trying to do. What does it mean? What are you trying to express? Not Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous.

Some of the greatest moments I've ever had were where somebody sat me down and turned me on to something entirely new. The first time you hear Kind of Blue or something, it's just a revelation; it freaks you out to your core. You're like, ‘Wow, I didn't know that was possible.’ It makes you look at everything differently; life as a whole. I think music is much more powerful and can be used in much more powerful ways than it is now. It takes the right musical leaders and the right bands and the right artists to get that message out there again. It's one of the few art forms that is completely intangible; it's here and gone, and it can change things.


As a child of the 50's I agree that things were better in 1967, but lets not forget that these songs were monster hits:

1. To Sir With Love, Lulu
2. Happy Together, The Turtles
3. Windy, Association
5. I'm A Believer, The Monkees
7. Somethin' Stupid, Nancy Sinatra and Frank Sinatra
8. The Letter, Box Tops
10. Kind Of A Drag, Buckinghams
11. Little Bit O' Soul, Music Explosion
12. I Think We're Alone Now, Tommy James and The Shondells
15. Come Back When You Grow Up, Bobby Vee and The Strangers
17. Can't Take My Eyes Off You, Frankie Valli
18. Never My Love, Association
20. Expressway To Your Heart, Soul Survivors

What we did have back in the 60's and early 70's were Alternative FM Stations in many university towns and larger cities. They often played entire LP's without commercials, and they played real music. You could hear Live At the Fillmore maybe followed by Albert King and the Buffalo Springfield.

But back to the question of Derek. Recently I was looking at that Rolling Stones Poll of the Greatest Guitarists of All Time, and I realized I had actually seen the top 3 up close and in concert. Hendrix, Duane, and B.B. King. I also got to see lots of others like Peter Green, Jimmy Page, Rory Gallagher a.m.m.

I can tell you this, seeing Duane in late 1970 was SO MUCH more intense than anything I had seen, including Hendrix and B.B.. I knew I was experiencing something extraordinary, it was one of those moments when time slows down and you are totally in the moment. I never thought I would experience anything like that again, even though I've seen lots of fantastic guitarists in the ensuing years.

Then I saw the DVD of the ABB Live At the Beacon Theatre. All I know is that when Derek played on Desdemona, I had the same feeling I had when I saw Duane. It sounds corny, but I was like a religious experience. It moved me in a way I hadn't been moved since Duane, time seemed to stand still. One gets the feeling that the music is being inspired from a higher place - that to me is greatness. Skill is part of it, but only part.

So forgive me for repeating myself, but it's this transcendent emotive quality that makes me call Duane, Derek, Miles, and Coltrane great.

I don't have any idea if Derek will ever be "famous", but I have no doubt that in time he will be recognized as one of the true greats, and those of you who have the opportunity to see him regularly will be sharing your memories with younger fans 30 years from now - just as those of us who experienced Duane do now.

[Edited on 10/9/2005 by TrucksAndGi-tars]

 

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  posted on 10/9/2005 at 10:38 AM
I think that somewhere duane is grinning! and proud of dereks efforts, and is happy that his music is being carried on at such a high level of musicianship and soul.[not just some guys going through the motions for a paycheck] duanes spirit lives on indeed!!!
 

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  posted on 10/9/2005 at 05:40 PM
quote:
quote:
I don't see the DTB (or the ABB for that matter) getting on the pop charts. Can they gain the larger fame they so richly deserve if so much of the world is unaware of them? Doug


Doug I keep coming back to what Derek himself has said about this. Here's a quote from 2003:

As a child of the 50's I agree that things were better in 1967, but lets not forget that these songs were monster hits:

1. To Sir With Love, Lulu
2. Happy Together, The Turtles
3. Windy, Association
5. I'm A Believer, The Monkees
7. Somethin' Stupid, Nancy Sinatra and Frank Sinatra
8. The Letter, Box Tops
10. Kind Of A Drag, Buckinghams
11. Little Bit O' Soul, Music Explosion
12. I Think We're Alone Now, Tommy James and The Shondells
15. Come Back When You Grow Up, Bobby Vee and The Strangers
17. Can't Take My Eyes Off You, Frankie Valli
18. Never My Love, Association
20. Expressway To Your Heart, Soul Survivors

What we did have back in the 60's and early 70's were Alternative FM Stations in many university towns and larger cities. They often played entire LP's without commercials, and they played real music. You could hear Live At the Fillmore maybe followed by Albert King and the Buffalo Springfield.

You hit the nail on the head here. Alternative radio as it existed in 1970 no longer exists. Even the rock stations play the same 100 songs over and over again. Perhaps satellite can change things and the internet surely has. The bottom line is that musicians like Derek and Warren can earn a good living and a good deal of acclaim doing what they do because of the existence of independent labels, the internet to promote themselves and the ability to play in smaller venues on a continuous basis. Their audience exists and thanks to these mediums, they can reach it. I thank God that musicians like Warren and Derek exist in this horrible pop music climate to whom the music is more important than either the money or the fame. I never listen to commercial radio anymore.

Doug

 

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  posted on 10/9/2005 at 10:05 PM
quote:
quote:
quote:
I don't see the DTB (or the ABB for that matter) getting on the pop charts. Can they gain the larger fame they so richly deserve if so much of the world is unaware of them? Doug


Doug I keep coming back to what Derek himself has said about this. Here's a quote from 2003:

As a child of the 50's I agree that things were better in 1967, but lets not forget that these songs were monster hits:

1. To Sir With Love, Lulu
2. Happy Together, The Turtles
3. Windy, Association
5. I'm A Believer, The Monkees
7. Somethin' Stupid, Nancy Sinatra and Frank Sinatra
8. The Letter, Box Tops
10. Kind Of A Drag, Buckinghams
11. Little Bit O' Soul, Music Explosion
12. I Think We're Alone Now, Tommy James and The Shondells
15. Come Back When You Grow Up, Bobby Vee and The Strangers
17. Can't Take My Eyes Off You, Frankie Valli
18. Never My Love, Association
20. Expressway To Your Heart, Soul Survivors

What we did have back in the 60's and early 70's were Alternative FM Stations in many university towns and larger cities. They often played entire LP's without commercials, and they played real music. You could hear Live At the Fillmore maybe followed by Albert King and the Buffalo Springfield.

You hit the nail on the head here. Alternative radio as it existed in 1970 no longer exists. Even the rock stations play the same 100 songs over and over again. Perhaps satellite can change things and the internet surely has. The bottom line is that musicians like Derek and Warren can earn a good living and a good deal of acclaim doing what they do because of the existence of independent labels, the internet to promote themselves and the ability to play in smaller venues on a continuous basis. Their audience exists and thanks to these mediums, they can reach it. I thank God that musicians like Warren and Derek exist in this horrible pop music climate to whom the music is more important than either the money or the fame. I never listen to commercial radio anymore.

Doug
derek wasnt a child of the 50s he was born in 1979.

 

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  posted on 10/10/2005 at 02:42 AM
Pops42, this is how the matter of 1967 came up.

quote:
The question is, given the music world we live in now, will Derek ever gain the kind of international fame that a Clapton or Hendrix received in the period when Rock music was the world and these men were regarded by the entire industry as great artists. Today the musicians we revere seem more separated from the larger pop world than they did in 1967.

 

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  posted on 10/10/2005 at 03:18 PM
i really dig derek hes the man i love his tone and style
-tc

 

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  posted on 10/10/2005 at 07:07 PM
the greatest is so subjective that it's a mute point to argue it. all we can do is:

1 - appreciate his god-given talents
2 - experience it live every chance we get
3 - turn more people on to it

and the last one is the challenge. i'm promoting one of his shows and i can't even get some friends, co-workers and family members to go. i say, trust me, you'll thank me later and they shrug.

all that said, he is my favorite and i do believe that when all is said and done, he will go down as one of the greatest who ever lived. he lives a clean life, respects the music of his elders and purposefully skips the major pay check to play music for us in small clubs. i'm very thankful for this. it's a rare trait and one that i'll respect as much as his talent.

sul

 

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  posted on 10/12/2005 at 08:17 AM
That's a 'moot' point, sully. Your point, nevertheless, is spot on.

 

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  posted on 10/12/2005 at 08:31 AM
looking forward to hos creativity and talent for many years!!!!!!!

 

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  posted on 10/12/2005 at 08:33 AM
quote:
quote:
I don't see the DTB (or the ABB for that matter) getting on the pop charts. Can they gain the larger fame they so richly deserve if so much of the world is unaware of them? Doug
GRREAT POST!!

Doug I keep coming back to what Derek himself has said about this. Here's a quote from 2003:
quote:
I feel that when you look across the board, whether it's commercial radio or all the other things that are destroying the art of live music, I think it's at a very dangerous place right now...I understand that the pop scene is always going to be up front, but it shouldn't be 99 to 1. It shouldn't be 70 to 30. There's got to be some room for real music...

When you're force-feeding the masses the same crap, you're just dumbing people. You're dumbing people to music; you're lowering the standards. And not by a little, but by leaps and bounds. I attribute it to music being used now as a means to make bread only...

It's all about that you have to make a certain amount of money and sell a certain amount of records. There are no development deals anymore. The reason the Allman Brothers formed is that someone at Atlantic believed in Duane and said, ‘Go start a band.’ You know, ‘Here's some cash, you got a few years, try to make something happen.’ That kind of stuff rarely happens anymore.

I really don't want to know about your new pool. I want to know musically what you're trying to say, what you're trying to do. What does it mean? What are you trying to express? Not Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous.

Some of the greatest moments I've ever had were where somebody sat me down and turned me on to something entirely new. The first time you hear Kind of Blue or something, it's just a revelation; it freaks you out to your core. You're like, ‘Wow, I didn't know that was possible.’ It makes you look at everything differently; life as a whole. I think music is much more powerful and can be used in much more powerful ways than it is now. It takes the right musical leaders and the right bands and the right artists to get that message out there again. It's one of the few art forms that is completely intangible; it's here and gone, and it can change things.


As a child of the 50's I agree that things were better in 1967, but lets not forget that these songs were monster hits:

1. To Sir With Love, Lulu
2. Happy Together, The Turtles
3. Windy, Association
5. I'm A Believer, The Monkees
7. Somethin' Stupid, Nancy Sinatra and Frank Sinatra
8. The Letter, Box Tops
10. Kind Of A Drag, Buckinghams
11. Little Bit O' Soul, Music Explosion
12. I Think We're Alone Now, Tommy James and The Shondells
15. Come Back When You Grow Up, Bobby Vee and The Strangers
17. Can't Take My Eyes Off You, Frankie Valli
18. Never My Love, Association
20. Expressway To Your Heart, Soul Survivors

What we did have back in the 60's and early 70's were Alternative FM Stations in many university towns and larger cities. They often played entire LP's without commercials, and they played real music. You could hear Live At the Fillmore maybe followed by Albert King and the Buffalo Springfield.

But back to the question of Derek. Recently I was looking at that Rolling Stones Poll of the Greatest Guitarists of All Time, and I realized I had actually seen the top 3 up close and in concert. Hendrix, Duane, and B.B. King. I also got to see lots of others like Peter Green, Jimmy Page, Rory Gallagher a.m.m.

I can tell you this, seeing Duane in late 1970 was SO MUCH more intense than anything I had seen, including Hendrix and B.B.. I knew I was experiencing something extraordinary, it was one of those moments when time slows down and you are totally in the moment. I never thought I would experience anything like that again, even though I've seen lots of fantastic guitarists in the ensuing years.

Then I saw the DVD of the ABB Live At the Beacon Theatre. All I know is that when Derek played on Desdemona, I had the same feeling I had when I saw Duane. It sounds corny, but I was like a religious experience. It moved me in a way I hadn't been moved since Duane, time seemed to stand still. One gets the feeling that the music is being inspired from a higher place - that to me is greatness. Skill is part of it, but only part.

So forgive me for repeating myself, but it's this transcendent emotive quality that makes me call Duane, Derek, Miles, and Coltrane great.

I don't have any idea if Derek will ever be "famous", but I have no doubt that in time he will be recognized as one of the true greats, and those of you who have the opportunity to see him regularly will be sharing your memories with younger fans 30 years from now - just as those of us who experienced Duane do now.

[Edited on 10/9/2005 by TrucksAndGi-tars]

 

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  posted on 10/12/2005 at 10:03 AM
quote:
I can tell you this, seeing Duane in late 1970 was SO MUCH more intense than anything I had seen, including Hendrix and B.B.. I knew I was experiencing something extraordinary, it was one of those moments when time slows down and you are totally in the moment. I never thought I would experience anything like that again, even though I've seen lots of fantastic guitarists in the ensuing years.

Then I saw the DVD of the ABB Live At the Beacon Theatre. All I know is that when Derek played on Desdemona, I had the same feeling I had when I saw Duane. It sounds corny, but I was like a religious experience. It moved me in a way I hadn't been moved since Duane, time seemed to stand still. One gets the feeling that the music is being inspired from a higher place - that to me is greatness. Skill is part of it, but only part.


Never heard it said better. After seeing Duane there was always a void in any other music. There was an intensity and sweetness to his playing that was indescribable. You literally had to catch your breath after each solo. I missed Derek the first time he played in VB, when he was about 15. I haven't missed him since and I love to take trips and see the dTb whenever possible. Derek brings that same originality, intensity, and feeling out every time I see him, and that's a bunch. Enjoy Derek, he's one in a zillion.

 

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http://champions.chordomafoundation.org/pages/57

If you drive a nail into a tree, the hole remains even if you pull it back out. Think about it before you grab that hammer. Saying you’re sorry isn’t nearly as good as not having to.

 

Peach Head



Karma:
Posts: 87
(87 all sites)
Registered: 10/6/2005
Status: Offline

  posted on 10/13/2005 at 04:34 PM
again derek is xtremo great he is awsomely sweet and super dooper
-tc

 

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i like to do stuff

 
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