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Author: Subject: TTB doing Mad Dogs & Englishmen @ Lockn'

Maximum Peach





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  posted on 4/16/2015 at 02:02 PM
Today's announcement out of Lockn' is that TTB and special guests will pay tribute to Joe Cocker by performing "Mad Dogs and Englishmen". The current special guests are Leon Russell, Dave Mason, Rita Coolidge, Chris Robinson, Doyle Bramhall II & Friends - with more folks to be announced.

I've got to say this festival is shaping up to be an old hippies nirvana.

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 4/16/2015 at 03:37 PM
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  posted on 4/17/2015 at 07:15 AM
Yeah, this might be one of the best sets of the entire summer's festival circuit. This looks AWESOME.

 

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  posted on 4/17/2015 at 09:10 AM
I listened to the album yesterday. There are some fantastic tunes in that live outing. The vocals are really rough and I gotta think that Mike Mattison and Mark Rivers are going to lift some of those Joe Cocker lyrics to new heights.

I am really excited for this set.

I hope to get to the Lockn' Bowl tomorrow to catch the first show at the amphitheater. If the weather holds it should be a great Saturday night of music. I don't know anything about the two opening acts and kinda feel like I'd be more inclined to make the drive if it were only TTB playing.

 

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Maximum Peach



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  posted on 4/17/2015 at 02:55 PM
quote:
I listened to the album yesterday. There are some fantastic tunes in that live outing. The vocals are really rough and I gotta think that Mike Mattison and Mark Rivers are going to lift some of those Joe Cocker lyrics to new heights.


Rough?

I know this is a matter of taste and I respect your right to different opinion,but this album and vocals(which I grew up loving,saw Leon Live tour and Joe quite often-perhaps reason or my opinion!) IMHO is one of the classic albums and vocal performances in rock history.Yes,it was rough---like many R&R vocals tend to sound kinda rough---Gregg's growl,Leon's voice (one of my faves),Tom Waits,Richard Manuel,Jim Morrison,Dylan....lots of rough singers..Joe was one of the best...his phrasing,his interpretations-just stunning.The TTB singers may be well liked,but thy are no Joe Cockers.

Not looking to chnge minds,merely a viewpoint!

 

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  posted on 4/17/2015 at 03:35 PM
I bought my tickets when Mule announced 2 nights. This festival just seems to be getting better. Every week they are making some great announcements. I am very excited. I will be skipping Mt Jam to go to this one!
 

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  posted on 4/17/2015 at 03:46 PM
No worries. My mind won't be changed. I certainly enjoyed listening to the album. It has been a long time in between listens. I stand by my opinion. It doesn't differ much from many of the critics, except that I really like the album, especially the raw emotion.

Check out this review from 1970.

quote:

Mad Dogs & Englishmen

Not Rated
Mad Dogs & Englishmen Joe Cocker
By Pete Nartez October 1, 1970

This live two-album set is probably indispensable to diehard Joe Cocker fans. Anyone else should proceed at his own risk.

The reason isn't too hard to figure out. Mad Dogs and Englishmen was formed on a few days' notice to meet contractual obligations, and sounds like, well, like a group that was formed on a few days' notice to meet contractual obligations. With the exception of Leon Russell, who excels on guitar as well as on piano, no one has any musical identity on this album. Neither is the group as a whole much of a back-up for Cocker. Each guy seems to be playing fills for everyone else, and the arrangements are oh so predictable and mechanical.

Which results in a spiritless version of "Honky Tonk Women," undoubtedly the most spirited song in a good while, a version of "Cry Me a River" that's in its own way as embarrassing as the original, sad fillers like "Superstar," and a host of other songs that so overlap stylistically they tend to blur into one long, semi-interesting piece. Cocker either can't or doesn't want to rise above the cumbersome performance.

There are some highlights. "Feelin' Alright" is rousing, and Joe and the gang do a pretty good job on "Let's Go Get Stoned," though the song suffers from all that superfluous emoting at the end. "I've Been Loving You Too Long" almost saves a blue medley that also includes "Drown In My Own Tears" and "When Something Is Wrong With My Baby." You can shake your moneymaker to "Give Peace a Chance" (the one written by Russell and Bonnie Bramlett, not John and Yoko), and they close strong with "Delta Lady."

It should be noted that the Fillmore East audience (which included Dylan, according to the introduction to "Girl From the North Country" couldn't get enough, so maybe it's all just a matter of taste. It should also be noted that this is "music from the original soundtrack," and you know what that means. Ninety minutes of variations on Joe's Woodstock sequence, no doubt.

Mad Dogs and Englishmen was a lark, and seemed to be a lot of fun for many. But they sure didn't cut it musically, and let's hope that now that they've disbanded, Joe can reassemble a smaller group akin to the Grease Band and get back to doing his real thing.

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/albumreviews/mad-dogs-englishmen-19701001 #ixzz3XbKArWrM


I meant no offense to Joe Cocker or his fans. But I sincerely look forward to a vocally more polished version. Will it be "better"? That's too subjective. It will most certainly be different.

Regarding rough voices - at 12 or 13 years old I knew "Carney" by heart. "The Heart of Saturday Night" is close to my favorite album. If you want to compare Gregg's voice to Joe's listen to Gregg's live album next to "Mad Dogs" and I believe you will find far more range and melody in Gregg's voice. I doubt I'm the only one with that opinion.

But again, no offense to Joe. This performance is going to be a tribute and believe you me - I'll be sending beaming good vibes out to Mr. Cocker wherever he may be singing.

 

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Maximum Peach



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  posted on 4/17/2015 at 09:55 PM
quote:
No worries. My mind won't be changed. I certainly enjoyed listening to the album. It has been a long time in between listens. I stand by my opinion. It doesn't differ much from many of the critics, except that I really like the album, especially the raw emotion.

Check out this review from 1970.

quote:

Mad Dogs & Englishmen

Not Rated
Mad Dogs & Englishmen Joe Cocker
By Pete Nartez October 1, 1970

This live two-album set is probably indispensable to diehard Joe Cocker fans. Anyone else should proceed at his own risk.

The reason isn't too hard to figure out. Mad Dogs and Englishmen was formed on a few days' notice to meet contractual obligations, and sounds like, well, like a group that was formed on a few days' notice to meet contractual obligations. With the exception of Leon Russell, who excels on guitar as well as on piano, no one has any musical identity on this album. Neither is the group as a whole much of a back-up for Cocker. Each guy seems to be playing fills for everyone else, and the arrangements are oh so predictable and mechanical.

Which results in a spiritless version of "Honky Tonk Women," undoubtedly the most spirited song in a good while, a version of "Cry Me a River" that's in its own way as embarrassing as the original, sad fillers like "Superstar," and a host of other songs that so overlap stylistically they tend to blur into one long, semi-interesting piece. Cocker either can't or doesn't want to rise above the cumbersome performance.

There are some highlights. "Feelin' Alright" is rousing, and Joe and the gang do a pretty good job on "Let's Go Get Stoned," though the song suffers from all that superfluous emoting at the end. "I've Been Loving You Too Long" almost saves a blue medley that also includes "Drown In My Own Tears" and "When Something Is Wrong With My Baby." You can shake your moneymaker to "Give Peace a Chance" (the one written by Russell and Bonnie Bramlett, not John and Yoko), and they close strong with "Delta Lady."

It should be noted that the Fillmore East audience (which included Dylan, according to the introduction to "Girl From the North Country" couldn't get enough, so maybe it's all just a matter of taste. It should also be noted that this is "music from the original soundtrack," and you know what that means. Ninety minutes of variations on Joe's Woodstock sequence, no doubt.

Mad Dogs and Englishmen was a lark, and seemed to be a lot of fun for many. But they sure didn't cut it musically, and let's hope that now that they've disbanded, Joe can reassemble a smaller group akin to the Grease Band and get back to doing his real thing.

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/albumreviews/mad-dogs-englishmen-19701001 #ixzz3XbKArWrM


I meant no offense to Joe Cocker or his fans. But I sincerely look forward to a vocally more polished version. Will it be "better"? That's too subjective. It will most certainly be different.

Regarding rough voices - at 12 or 13 years old I knew "Carney" by heart. "The Heart of Saturday Night" is close to my favorite album. If you want to compare Gregg's voice to Joe's listen to Gregg's live album next to "Mad Dogs" and I believe you will find far more range and melody in Gregg's voice. I doubt I'm the only one with that opinion.

But again, no offense to Joe. This performance is going to be a tribute and believe you me - I'll be sending beaming good vibes out to Mr. Cocker wherever he may be singing.


Glad we share a love for Carney....it was an album I knew by heart too!

Yes,Gregg's voice is way smoother than Joe's but play it for the uninitiated and the reaction I've seen has been to its roughness--these are folks unexposed to blues or much of any R&R.I still recall the reaction of my parents,both musicians--Gregg's voice was an alien notion to them given their exposure.I guess it was kinda like when I hear someone like Tupac(am I dated!? LOL)--it makes no sense and my judgement is outside the context of the genre.

As for critics...never paid them much attention.As the writer said,its a matter of taste.We agree.

Anyway,enjoy the show,Billy.I like seeing the guests,particularly Leon.

Is this being streamed live?

 

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  posted on 4/17/2015 at 10:11 PM
quote:
Is this being streamed live?


Too early to tell. The festival is September 10th - 13th.

 

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True Peach



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  posted on 4/20/2015 at 09:45 AM
quote:
No worries. My mind won't be changed. I certainly enjoyed listening to the album. It has been a long time in between listens. I stand by my opinion. It doesn't differ much from many of the critics, except that I really like the album, especially the raw emotion.

Check out this review from 1970.

quote:

Mad Dogs & Englishmen

Not Rated
Mad Dogs & Englishmen Joe Cocker
By Pete Nartez October 1, 1970

This live two-album set is probably indispensable to diehard Joe Cocker fans. Anyone else should proceed at his own risk.

The reason isn't too hard to figure out. Mad Dogs and Englishmen was formed on a few days' notice to meet contractual obligations, and sounds like, well, like a group that was formed on a few days' notice to meet contractual obligations. With the exception of Leon Russell, who excels on guitar as well as on piano, no one has any musical identity on this album. Neither is the group as a whole much of a back-up for Cocker. Each guy seems to be playing fills for everyone else, and the arrangements are oh so predictable and mechanical.

Which results in a spiritless version of "Honky Tonk Women," undoubtedly the most spirited song in a good while, a version of "Cry Me a River" that's in its own way as embarrassing as the original, sad fillers like "Superstar," and a host of other songs that so overlap stylistically they tend to blur into one long, semi-interesting piece. Cocker either can't or doesn't want to rise above the cumbersome performance.

There are some highlights. "Feelin' Alright" is rousing, and Joe and the gang do a pretty good job on "Let's Go Get Stoned," though the song suffers from all that superfluous emoting at the end. "I've Been Loving You Too Long" almost saves a blue medley that also includes "Drown In My Own Tears" and "When Something Is Wrong With My Baby." You can shake your moneymaker to "Give Peace a Chance" (the one written by Russell and Bonnie Bramlett, not John and Yoko), and they close strong with "Delta Lady."

It should be noted that the Fillmore East audience (which included Dylan, according to the introduction to "Girl From the North Country" couldn't get enough, so maybe it's all just a matter of taste. It should also be noted that this is "music from the original soundtrack," and you know what that means. Ninety minutes of variations on Joe's Woodstock sequence, no doubt.

Mad Dogs and Englishmen was a lark, and seemed to be a lot of fun for many. But they sure didn't cut it musically, and let's hope that now that they've disbanded, Joe can reassemble a smaller group akin to the Grease Band and get back to doing his real thing.

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/albumreviews/mad-dogs-englishmen-19701001 #ixzz3XbKArWrM


I meant no offense to Joe Cocker or his fans. But I sincerely look forward to a vocally more polished version. Will it be "better"? That's too subjective. It will most certainly be different.

Regarding rough voices - at 12 or 13 years old I knew "Carney" by heart. "The Heart of Saturday Night" is close to my favorite album. If you want to compare Gregg's voice to Joe's listen to Gregg's live album next to "Mad Dogs" and I believe you will find far more range and melody in Gregg's voice. I doubt I'm the only one with that opinion.

But again, no offense to Joe. This performance is going to be a tribute and believe you me - I'll be sending beaming good vibes out to Mr. Cocker wherever he may be singing.


If Derek and Company shared the reviewers disdain for the album, I hardly think they would be doing a tribute to it. I cannot recall any tribute show, whether to an album or an artist, where the result came close to being as good and enjoyable as the original. Like the reviewer said about Mad Dogs and Englishmen, being a one off show, any band doing a tribute cannot take much time to rehearse and road test the result, so the show is handicapped to start.

That said, if I was a fan of the TTB, I would gladly go to this show to see them step outside their standard setlist rotation to tackle a project like this. Warren does this constantly with Mule and it's nice to see Derek take some of the same risks.

 

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  posted on 4/20/2015 at 11:27 AM
the recorded show was not a one off; the tour and band was. Here is a great account of some of the goings on surrounding how this all come about:

http://www.allaboutjazz.com/the-colossal-triumph-of-joe-cockers-mad-dogs-an d-englishmen-joe-cocker-by-c-michael-bailey.php

TTB is a huge band, and will be prepped to flesh this out quite well. Having Sharon Jones and the Dap Kings as the opener for the summer tour is gonna be a hoot for all involved. wait til they start sitting in with each other - yowsa!!!!!!

 

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  posted on 4/20/2015 at 11:51 AM
quote:
the recorded show was not a one off; the tour and band was. Here is a great account of some of the goings on surrounding how this all come about:

http://www.allaboutjazz.com/the-colossal-triumph-of-joe-cockers-mad-dogs-an d-englishmen-joe-cocker-by-c-michael-bailey.php

TTB is a huge band, and will be prepped to flesh this out quite well. Having Sharon Jones and the Dap Kings as the opener for the summer tour is gonna be a hoot for all involved. wait til they start sitting in with each other - yowsa!!!!!!


Thanks for the link, I think that review is a bit more fitting that the one posted above.

My comment about the one-off performance was with regard to this and other tributes. I am sure TTB will give the tribute their best, especially since they have already done a number of these tunes.

 

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  posted on 4/20/2015 at 04:30 PM
quote:
Joe Cocker lyrics





I'm sure you meant vocals instead of lyrics. Joe wasn't much of a songwriter and I don't think anything on Mad Dogs & Englishmen was written by him.

 

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  posted on 4/20/2015 at 04:31 PM
Nice!!!
 

Maximum Peach



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  posted on 4/20/2015 at 05:04 PM
quote:
quote:
Joe Cocker lyrics




I'm sure you meant vocals instead of lyrics. Joe wasn't much of a songwriter and I don't think anything on Mad Dogs & Englishmen was written by him.



Yes. Vocals. Not lyrics.

 

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